Doctor of Philosophy in Library and Information Science

PhD in Library and Information Science

The PhD in Library and Information Science is a highly regarded and desirable credential for those interested in pursuing research in LIS, teaching at the post-secondary level and, increasingly, those seeking or working in leadership positions in libraries, information centers and a variety of other organizations.

Dominican's PhD in LIS was created with working professionals in mind. Unlike traditional residential PhD programs at large universities, our cohort-based program can be completed in just three years, with all coursework taken on weekends. 

Combining the rigor of a top-level research degree with the collaborative and personal approach that is the hallmark of a Dominican education, the PhD provides a strong yet flexible pathway that helps professionals expand their vision as well as advance their careers.

You'll work closely with a team of faculty advisors, professors and peers committed to both intellectual engagement and the professional skills needed to advance in your career. The cohort will progress through 12 intensive courses over six semesters (two years), with a third year devoted to a qualifying field examination and individual dissertation work.

Program Distinctions

  • Convenience: Classes meet weekends only on our River Forest campus, so you won't need to quit your job or delay your career to further your education.
  • Cohort model: The cohort model encourages intellectual engagement and professional development in a collaborative environment. New cohorts are launched each fall.
  • Revered faculty: You'll work closely with faculty members who bring years of professional and scholarly experience.
  • Personal attention: A team of advisors, faculty members, peers and professors of the practice will counsel you on meeting your goals, whether you come to the program with specific research interests, career or educational goals.

Recent graduates of the doctoral program are working as library and information leaders in libraries, schools and academia:

2013

  • Robert E. Connor, PhD
    “Literacy and Dissemination in the Order of St. John of the Hospital: An Argument for Hermeneutical Phenomenology”
  • Guilllermina Duarte, PhD
    “We’re Listening: Deafness and the Public Library – A Phenomenological Approach to Understanding the Public Library Experience of Children Who Are Deaf”
  • Alex Fraser, PhD
    "Conceptualization and Organization of Knowledge in Farabi's Enumeration of the Sciences (Ihsa al-ulm): A Modern Interpretation"
  • Kelly Visnak, PhD
    “A Cohort’s Culture of Learning”
  • Elizabeth H. Zak, PhD
    “Do You Believe in Magic? Exploring the Conceptualization of Augmented Reality and Its Implications for the User in the Field of Library and Information Science”

2012

  • Elizabeth P. Garcia, PhD
    "Information Seeking Behaviors of the School Social Worker: What Is the Librarian's Role in the Practice of Bibliotherapy?"
  • Anthony Molaro, PhD
    "Merging Large and Complex Library Organizations: A Phenomenological Approach to the Lived Experiences of Those Directly Involved"
  • Amy Phillips-Haskett, PhD
    “Framing the Public Library: The Public Perception of the Public Library in the Media"
  • Christina Ward, PhD
    "Fiction in the Young Adult Drug Curriculum: Impacts and Impressions"

To find out more or to apply to the PhD program, please contact program director Karen Brown, PhD, at kbrown@dom.edu or (708) 524-6856.

Doctor of Philosophy in Library and Information Science

Curriculum

Each cohort will complete the following courses (all courses are 3 credit hours):

First Year

Fall

Spring

Summer

Second Year

Fall

Spring

Summer

Two of the following courses on rotation depending on composition of cohort

Third Year

Upon completion of coursework, passing a qualifying field examination and approval of a dissertation proposal, PhD students proceed to dissertation work.

Degree Requirements

Successful completion of the doctoral program includes:

  • Completion of a minimum of 36 semester hours of doctoral coursework in the Dominican University GSLIS program;
  • Satisfactory completion of a dissertation;
  • A minimum grade point average of a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale;
  • Continuous enrollment in the degree program;
  • Competition of the degree program within three years* and;
  • Filing an Application for Graduation by the filing deadline with the Office of the Registrar the semester before the anticipated graduation date.

*The program is a three-year program requiring continuous enrollment in fall, spring and summer semesters for two years of coursework, with a dissertation work in the third year. If a student needs to extend beyond the 3 years, he/she may repeat the dissertation course for a period not to exceed an additional two years.